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Amazon asserts that the striking delivery drivers are not officially employed by Amazon.

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84 delivery drivers and dispatchers unite to demand that Amazon is accountable for their well-being while they work.

According to a recent report by Motherboard, a significant development has taken place within the realm of Amazon’s delivery operations in Palmdale, California. For the first time in the company’s history, a strike has been initiated by the Amazon delivery drivers stationed in this area. These drivers, who successfully unionized with the Teamsters back in April, gained official recognition from Amazon’s “Delivery Service Partner” (DSP) known as Battle-Tested Strategies in May. The primary catalyst behind this strike is the drivers’ unified demand for enhanced compensation and improved safety measures. Consequently, a total of 84 employees have chosen to participate in the strike, effectively ceasing their duties as of Thursday.

In a recent development, a significant event unfolded as Amazon delivery drivers collectively staged a notable strike, marking a historic moment in the realm of driver activism. The original article by Motherboard aptly captured the essence of this incident with the headline “Amazon Delivery Drivers Walk Out in First-Ever Driver Strike.” Subsequently, an email communication was initiated by a representative from Amazon, urging the publication to reconsider and modify the headline.

What arguments Amazon has

The vast bulk of Amazon’s fleet, which is mostly made up of hired labour, is under Amazon’s strong influence and control even though it does not legally employ these people. The scope of Amazon’s influence goes much beyond just aesthetics, despite the fact that these employees wear Amazon clothing and drive delivery trucks sporting the company’s trademark artwork. The corporation carefully controls the way its drivers dress and limits their online behaviour, dictating what they can wear and publish online. Additionally, Amazon has control over the safety requirements that must be met before drivers can resume work, in essence deciding when they can do so in the event of an emergency.

Amazon has control over the safety requirements that must be met before drivers can resume work, in essence deciding when they can do so in the event of an emergency. Additionally, drivers must consent to being watched by artificial intelligence (AI) systems in order to be employed.

The union’s claims of unfair labour practises became centred on this pervasive degree of control, and in early May it formally filed a complaint with the National Labour Relations Board. The union specifically criticised Amazon’s practise of helping people start delivery logistics businesses that are only engaged in serving Amazon.

An that these concerns were unfounded, as the confirmed release date of August 31st looms ever closer.

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